LTSP Server

From MEPIS Documentation Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

!!! Warning! The info contained in this article pertains to older versions of MEPIS !!!
Instructions to set up Mepis LTSP from scratch

One Mepis laptop can run 20 client laptops!

Contents

Introduction

LTSP is an add-on package for Linux that allows you to connect lots of low-powered thin client terminals to a Linux server. Applications run on the server and accept input and display their output on the thin client display. LTSP is available as a set of packages that can be installed on any Linux system. Example of usage

Hardware for a 20 seat system

  • One decent laptop or desktop (P4 or better)+ 2 network cards.
  • Extra ram (1 Gig is OK 2 is better)
  • Up to 20 'obsolete' laptops or desktops with network cards
  • 20 port gigabit switch.
  • 22 lengths of cat 5 cable.

MEPIS 8

LTSP has been completely redesigned to fit into Linux distributions more easily. Follow the Debian Howto

MEPIS 7

Server

First install 2 network cards and install Mepis then open a command line and type;

   su 
   'Your root password'
   update-rc.d -f guarddog remove 
   apt-get install ltsp-utils dhcp3-server atftpd portmap nfs-kernel-server

Say 'OK' to dhcp being non-authorative. Say 'NO' to the portmap question. When prompted to configure dhcpd only listen on eth1, when prompted to configure atfpd use the default answer to all questions.

   rm /etc/dhcp3/dhcpd.conf
   update-rc.d -f dhcp3-server remove
   update-rc.d dhcp3-server start 20 2 3 4 5 . stop 1 6 .
   su -
   ltspadmin

Go through the following options on the ltspadmin screen:

a) Select the second option; - configure installer options. Say yes/default to all.

b) Select the first option; - install; press a to select all components. press q to install ltsp. (this will take a while)

c) Select the third option - configure; Work through steps 1-11 in the last section as below;


1. Leave as it is.

2. Leave as it is.

3. yes to auto-generate config file.

4. ok

5. ok

6. yes to enable

7. yes to enable kdm, no to disable graphical (This section often does not work for enabling XDMCP and reports that it is NOT working when it actually IS).

8. yes to creating hosts

9. yes to creating host.allow

10. yes to creating exports

11. yes to creating lts.conf file

Make sure you fix the dhcpd.conf as described here on the LTSP wiki (it should be ok by default)


select an interface for your LTSP connections. You can do this by adding the following in;

 nano /etc/network/interfaces
       auto eth1
       iface eth1 inet static
         address 192.168.0.254
         netmask 255.255.255.0

then;

ifdown eth1
ifup eth1

Will bring up the interface (and to activate it with your new settings). then;

  apt-get remove kdm
  apt-get install gdm
  nano /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf
  

In the file /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf search for the line 'the security of xdmcp' (type <ctrl>+<W> 'the security of xdmcp') change the line below it to 'enable=true' Reboot the machine

Finding Device IDs and MAC addresses

PCI IDs are two 4 digit hexadecimal numbers with a ':' between them. The first number is a 'manufacturer ID', e.g.

  • 10ec = Realtek
  • 10b7 = 3Com

The second for is the 'device ID' specific to particular devices. Example:

  • 10ec:8139' is a Realtek 8139 card
  • 10b7:9058' is a 3com 905b card

They look a bit different when you get to the www.rom-o-matic.net site, like this;

  • 0x10ec,0x8139
  • 0x10b7,0x9058.

You need to find the PCI ID to make an Etherboot image to either put on a floppy or a ROM. You can find both the PCI ID and the Mac address at the same time with a live CD

On the client machine using MEPIS live cd run;

lspci 

and then

lspci -n

this will allow you to match up the network card with it's device ID tell you the device ID. While you are there, you can use

ifconfig -a 

to reveal the MAC address of the card too.

Here is an example of the output of lspci and lspci -n:

ben@watasenia:~$ lspci
0000:00:00.0 Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8366/A/7 [Apollo KT266/A/333]
0000:00:01.0 PCI bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8366/A/7 [Apollo KT266/A/333 AGP]
0000:00:08.0 Ethernet controller: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL-8139/8139C/8139C+ (rev 10)
0000:00:0a.0 Multimedia audio controller: Yamaha Corporation YMF-724 (rev 05)
0000:00:10.3 USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. USB 2.0 (rev 82)
0000:00:11.0 ISA bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8235 ISA Bridge
0000:00:11.1 IDE interface: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82C586A/B/VT82C686/A/B/VT823x/A/C PIPC Bus   
Master IDE (rev 06)
0000:01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation NV11 [GeForce2 MX/MX 400] (rev b2)
ben@watasenia:~$ lspci -n
0000:00:00.0 0600: 1106:3099
0000:00:01.0 0604: 1106:b099
0000:00:08.0 0200: 10ec:8139 (rev 10)
0000:00:0a.0 0401: 1073:0004 (rev 05)
0000:00:10.3 0c03: 1106:3104 (rev 82)
0000:00:11.0 0601: 1106:3177
0000:00:11.1 0101: 1106:0571 (rev 06)
0000:01:00.0 0300: 10de:0110 (rev b2)

In this example the ethernet controller has a device ID of 10ec:8139 and it's a Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL-8139/8139C/8139C+ (rev 10)


Setting up a client for PXE (network card) boot

  • find the MAC address of the network card
  • add to the '/etc/dhcp3/dhcpd.conf' file the DHCP entry on the server machine. This will include the MAC, IP, hostname, location of the kernel. You should add IP addresses starting at 192.168.0.10 as below. Where /path/to/boot/image will be whatever 2.6 kernel is in tftpboot/lts/2.6whatever/pxelinux.0
 host ws001 {
  hardware ethernet 00:11:22:33:44:55;
  fixed-address 192.168.0.10;
  filename "/path/to/boot/image"; 
 }
  • restart dhcp3 server using /etc/init.d/dhcp3-server restart
  • you may need to edit /opt/ltsp/etc/lts.conf to help the client through a difficult boot.
  • WRITE THE MAC ADDRESS ON THE CLIENT, FOR EASY INSTALL WHEN IT'S BEING ADDED TO SOMEONES LTSP SET UP.


Setting up a client for floppy disk boot

  • Plug in client to server
  • find the PCI ID of the network card in the machine you are using.
  • go to http://www.rom-o-matic.net and select latest release
  • select network controller with the right vendor and device and ID
  • Select '.zdsk' in the image type box
  • Click on the "configure" link
  • put -1 in ASK_BOOT
  • Click on "get ROM" to retrieve your boot image
  • save the file you get
  • insert floppy into the server machine (to make a floppy for your client)
cat eb-5.4.1-nameoffile.zdsk > /dev/fd0

(this will make the floppy into an etherboot floppy)

  • insert floppy into the client machine set the BIOS to boot from floppy
  • find the MAC address of the network card (this will be revealed when the floppy boots and finds the card)
  • add to the '/etc/dhcp3/dhcpd.conf' file the DHCP entry. This will include the MAC, IP, hostname, location of the kernel. You should add IP addresses starting at 192.168.0.10 as below. Where /path/to/boot/image will be whatever 2.6 kernel is in /tftpboot/lts/2.6whatever/lts
host ws001 {
  hardware ethernet 00:11:22:33:44:55;
  fixed-address 192.168.0.10;
  filename "/path/to/boot/image";
 }
  • restart dhcp3 server using /etc/init.d/dhcp3-server restart
  • you may need to edit /opt/ltsp/etc/lts.conf to help the client through a difficult boot.
  • WRITE THE MAC ADDRESS ON THE CLIENT, FOR EASY INSTALL WHEN IT'S BEING ADDED TO SOMEONES LTSP SET UP.
Personal tools
In other languages